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The Profile of Older Adults Seeking Chiropractic Care: A Secondary Analysis

By |May 9, 2021|Low Back Pain, Medicare|

The Profile of Older Adults Seeking Chiropractic Care: A Secondary Analysis

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   BMC Geriatrics 2021 (Apr 23);   21 (1):   271

   OPEN ACCESS   

Katie de Luca, Sheilah Hogg-Johnson, Martha Funabashi, Silvano Mior & Simon D. French

Department of Chiropractic,
Faculty of Medicine,
Health and Human Sciences,
Macquarie University,
Sydney, Australia.


Background:   Musculoskeletal conditions are the primary reason older adults seek general medical care, resulting in older adults as the highest consumers of health care services. While there is high use of chiropractic care by older adults, there is no recent, specific data on why older adults seek chiropractic care and how chiropractors manage conditions. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe the demographic characteristics of older adults seeking chiropractic care, and to report problems diagnosed by chiropractors and the treatment provided to older adults who seek chiropractic care.

Methods:   A secondary data analysis from two, large cross-sectional observational studies conducted in Australia (COAST) and Canada (O-COAST). Patient encounter and diagnoses were classified using the International Classification of Primary Care, 2nd edition (ICPC-2), using the Australian ICPC-2 PLUS general practice terminology and the ICPC-2 PLUS Chiro terminology. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize chiropractor, patient and encounter characteristics. Encounter and patient characteristics were compared between younger (< 65 years old) and older (≥65 years old) adults using ?2 tests or t-tests, accounting for the clustering of patients and encounters within chiropractors.

Results:   A total of 6,781 chiropractor-adult patient encounters were recorded. Of these, 1,067 encounters were for persons aged > 65 years (16%), from 897 unique older patients. The most common diagnosis within older adult encounters was a back problem (56%), followed by neck problems (10%). Soft tissue techniques were most frequently used for older patients (85 in every 100 encounters) and in 29 of every 100 encounters, chiropractors recommended exercise to older patients as a part of their treatment.

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MEDICARE Page

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Spinal Pain in Pre-adolescence and the Relation with Screen Time and Physical Activity Behavior

By |May 2, 2021|Neck Pain, Pediatrics|

Spinal Pain in Pre-adolescence and the Relation with Screen Time and Physical Activity Behavior

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   BMC Musculoskelet Disord 2021 (Apr 26); 22 (1): 7 393

   OPEN ACCESS   

Anne Cathrine Joergensen, Katrine Strandberg-Larsen, Per Kragh Andersen, Lise Hestbaek, Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen

Section of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health,
Faculty of Health and Medical Science,
University of Copenhagen,
Oster Farimagsgade 5, Box 2099,
DK-1014, Copenhagen K, Denmark.


Background:   To investigate how screen time and physical activity behavior were associated with spinal pain in pre-adolescence.

Methods:   This study included 45,555 pre-adolescents who participated in the 11–year follow-up of the Danish National Birth Cohort. The 11–year follow-up included self-reported information on computer and TV behavior, aspects of physical activity, as well as frequency and intensity of spinal pain (neck-, mid back- and low back pain). Data were linked with parental socioeconomic data from Statistics Denmark registers. Associations were estimated using multinomial logistic regression models. To account for sample selection, we applied inverse probability weighting.

Results:   Duration of screen time was stepwise associated with the degree of spinal pain. Compared with those spending < 2 h/day in front of a screen, screen time of ≥6 h/day was associated with a substantially increased relative risk ratio (RRR) of severe pain for both girls (RRR: 2.49, 95% CI: 2.13–2.92) and boys (RRR: 1.95, 95% CI: 1.65–2.32). Being physical inactive was likewise associated with higher likelihood of severe spinal pain (RRR: 1.22, 95% CI: 1.10–1.34) relative to those being moderately active. We observed that being physically active was seemingly associated with lower risk of spinal pain among boys with high frequency of screen time.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Pediatrics Section

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Our Blog is a Tool. Learn How To Use It Now

By |May 1, 2021|Uncategorized|

Our Blog is a Tool. Learn How To Use It Now

The Chiro.Org Blog


A Chiro.Org Editorial


Every Blog post is an announcement of new material that was just added to one of our many Sections.

I have been compiling (and archiving) peer-reviewed articles since early 1996, and to date we have thousands of Abstracts, and many hundreds of Full-Text articles on a wide variety of subjects.

When enough material, relating to a particular topic was collected, it was gathered into a new Topical Page in one of our many Sections.

Each Topical page is located in the Section most associated with that topic.
Thus, our Attention Deficit Page is located (is a part of) our Pediatrics Section   You get the idea.

Almost ALL of our Sections contain some, or many Topical collections. The LINKS Section is the most extreme example, because it contains 95 different topical pages.

All of the following are “active” Sections that are constantly adding new (and important) materials:

Acupuncture
Alternative Healing Abstracts
Case Studies
Chiropractic Assistants
Chiropractic Research
Chronic Neck Pain
Conditions That Respond Well
Cost-Effectiveness of Chiropractic
Documentation
Global Burden of Disease
Headache and Chiropractic
The LINKS
Low Back Pain and Chiropractic
Medicare Info
Nutrition
Pediatrics
Radiology
The SEARCH Section
Stroke and Chiropractic
What is the Chiropractic Subluxation?
Whiplash and Chiropractic
These other Sections are “archival” in nature, and contain valuable tools:

Chiropractic History
ChiroZine
Free Images
New DC’s
Office Forms
R.C. Schafer’s Rehab Monogaphs
The Wilk Antitrust Lawsuit


How Blog Posts Work

The following is a Graphic “screen grab” of a Blog Post from our Home Page.
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The COMMENTS Section is Back!

By |April 30, 2021|Uncategorized|

The COMMENTS Section is Back!

The Chiro.Org Blog


In the last 7 years, we have relocated to a new (better) server 4 different times.

Even though we moved all the Blog files over, WordPress automatically snaps back to its default (original) settings, so we had to fuss for a few days to get everything to look the way we previously designed it to appear.

UNFORTUNATELY, the one thing we missed (since it’s the one thing we never use) was the COMMENTS Section at the bottom of every full post. Evidently you always have to re-install the Comments section as well. Grrr!

The “Front Page” displays a portion of every post. To see the Full post, you either click the Title, or the Read More link at the bottom.

Below the full post is the COMMENTS Section.

The first time you make a comment, you will have to add your Name and your E-Mail address. After that, you will always be signed in.

You can also check the box(es) to follow future comments on that post, or to ask to be notified every time a new Blog Post is published. Very convenient!

We assure you that your e-mail address will NEVER be shared with anyone.

We also apologize that we missed this in the past, because it suppressed one of our most enjoyable features, discussing current research with friends and fellow DCs.

We are pleased to return full functionality to our Blog, and hope that you too will enjoy discussing these studies with your peers.

Patients Receiving Chiropractic Care in a Neurorehabilitation Hospital: A Descriptive Study

By |April 28, 2021|Chiropractic Care, Neurology|

Patients Receiving Chiropractic Care in a Neurorehabilitation Hospital: A Descriptive Study

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE: J Multidiscip Healthc. 2018 (May 3); 11: 223–231


Robert D Vining, Stacie A Salsbury, W Carl Cooley, Donna Gosselin, Lance Corber, and Christine M Goertz

Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research,
Palmer College of Chiropractic,
Davenport, IA, USA.


OBJECTIVES: Individuals rehabilitating from complex neurological injury require a multidisciplinary approach, which typically does not include chiropractic care. This study describes inpatients receiving multidisciplinary rehabilitation including chiropractic care for brain injury, spinal cord injury (SCI), stroke, and other complex neurological conditions.

DESIGN: Chiropractic services were integrated into Crotched Mountain Specialty Hospital (CMSH) through this project. Patient characteristics and chiropractic care data were collected to describe those receiving care and the interventions during the first 15 months when chiropractic services were available.

SETTING: CMSH, a 62–bed subacute multidisciplinary rehabilitation, skilled nursing facility located in Greenfield, New Hampshire, USA.

RESULTS: Patient mean (SD) age (n=27) was 42.8 (13) years, ranging from 20 to 64 years. Males (n=18, 67%) and those of white race/ethnicity (n=23, 85%) comprised the majority. Brain injury (n=20) was the most common admitting condition caused by trauma (n=9), hemorrhage (n=7), infarction (n=2), and general anoxia (n=2). Three patients were admitted for cervical SCI, 1 for ankylosing spondylitis, 1 for traumatic polyarthropathy, and 2 for respiratory failure with encephalopathy. Other common comorbid diagnoses potentially complicating the treatment and recovery process included myospasm (n=13), depression (n=11), anxiety (n=10), dysphagia (n=8), substance abuse (n=8), and candidiasis (n=7). Chiropractic procedures employed, by visit (n=641), included manual myofascial therapies (93%), mechanical percussion (83%), manual muscle stretching (75%), and thrust manipulation (65%) to address patients with spinal-related pain (n=15, 54%), joint or regional stiffness (n= 14, 50%), and extremity pain (n=13, 46%). Care often required adapting to participant limitations or conditions. Such adaptations not commonly encountered in outpatient settings where chiropractic care is usually delivered included the need for lift assistance, wheelchair dependence, contractures, impaired speech, quadriplegia/paraplegia, and the presence of feeding tubes and urinary catheters.

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