Support Chiropractic Research!

The Contemporary Model of Vertebral Column Joint Dysfunction and Impact of High-velocity, Low-amplitude Controlled Vertebral Thrusts on Neuromuscular Function

By |December 17, 2021|Neurology, Subluxation|

The Contemporary Model of Vertebral Column Joint Dysfunction and Impact of High-velocity, Low-amplitude Controlled Vertebral Thrusts on Neuromuscular Function

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   European J Applied Physiology 2021 (Oct); 121 (10): 2675–2720

Heidi Haavik, Nitika Kumari, Kelly Holt, Imran Khan Niazi, Imran Amjad, Amit N Pujari, Kemal Sitki Türker, Bernadette Murphy

Centre for Chiropractic Research,
New Zealand College of Chiropractic,
Auckland, New Zealand.



Purpose:   There is growing evidence that vertebral column function and dysfunction play a vital role in neuromuscular control. This invited review summarises the evidence about how vertebral column dysfunction, known as a central segmental motor control (CSMC) problem, alters neuromuscular function and how spinal adjustments (high-velocity, low-amplitude or HVLA thrusts directed at a CSMC problem) and spinal manipulation (HVLA thrusts directed at segments of the vertebral column that may not have clinical indicators of a CSMC problem) alters neuromuscular function.

Methods:   The current review elucidates the peripheral mechanisms by which CSMC problems, the spinal adjustment or spinal manipulation alter the afferent input from the paravertebral tissues. It summarises the contemporary model that provides a biologically plausible explanation for CSMC problems, the manipulable spinal lesion. This review also summarises the contemporary, biologically plausible understanding about how spinal adjustments enable more efficient production of muscular force. The evidence showing how spinal dysfunction, spinal manipulation and spinal adjustments alter central multimodal integration and motor control centres will be covered in a second invited review.

Results:   Many studies have shown spinal adjustments increase voluntary force and prevent fatigue, which mainly occurs due to altered supraspinal excitability and multimodal integration. The literature suggests physical injury, pain, inflammation, and acute or chronic physiological or psychological stress can alter the vertebral column’s central neural motor control, leading to a CSMC problem. The many gaps in the literature have been identified, along with suggestions for future studies.

There are more articles like this @ our:

CHIROPRACTIC SUBLUXATION Page

(more…)

Patients Receiving Chiropractic Care in a Neurorehabilitation Hospital: A Descriptive Study

By |April 28, 2021|Chiropractic Care, Neurology|

Patients Receiving Chiropractic Care in a Neurorehabilitation Hospital: A Descriptive Study

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE: J Multidiscip Healthc. 2018 (May 3); 11: 223–231


Robert D Vining, Stacie A Salsbury, W Carl Cooley, Donna Gosselin, Lance Corber, and Christine M Goertz

Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research,
Palmer College of Chiropractic,
Davenport, IA, USA.


OBJECTIVES: Individuals rehabilitating from complex neurological injury require a multidisciplinary approach, which typically does not include chiropractic care. This study describes inpatients receiving multidisciplinary rehabilitation including chiropractic care for brain injury, spinal cord injury (SCI), stroke, and other complex neurological conditions.

DESIGN: Chiropractic services were integrated into Crotched Mountain Specialty Hospital (CMSH) through this project. Patient characteristics and chiropractic care data were collected to describe those receiving care and the interventions during the first 15 months when chiropractic services were available.

SETTING: CMSH, a 62–bed subacute multidisciplinary rehabilitation, skilled nursing facility located in Greenfield, New Hampshire, USA.

RESULTS: Patient mean (SD) age (n=27) was 42.8 (13) years, ranging from 20 to 64 years. Males (n=18, 67%) and those of white race/ethnicity (n=23, 85%) comprised the majority. Brain injury (n=20) was the most common admitting condition caused by trauma (n=9), hemorrhage (n=7), infarction (n=2), and general anoxia (n=2). Three patients were admitted for cervical SCI, 1 for ankylosing spondylitis, 1 for traumatic polyarthropathy, and 2 for respiratory failure with encephalopathy. Other common comorbid diagnoses potentially complicating the treatment and recovery process included myospasm (n=13), depression (n=11), anxiety (n=10), dysphagia (n=8), substance abuse (n=8), and candidiasis (n=7). Chiropractic procedures employed, by visit (n=641), included manual myofascial therapies (93%), mechanical percussion (83%), manual muscle stretching (75%), and thrust manipulation (65%) to address patients with spinal-related pain (n=15, 54%), joint or regional stiffness (n= 14, 50%), and extremity pain (n=13, 46%). Care often required adapting to participant limitations or conditions. Such adaptations not commonly encountered in outpatient settings where chiropractic care is usually delivered included the need for lift assistance, wheelchair dependence, contractures, impaired speech, quadriplegia/paraplegia, and the presence of feeding tubes and urinary catheters.

(more…)

The Effect of Spinal Manipulation on Brain Neurometabolites

By |December 3, 2019|Low Back Pain, Neurology|

The Effect of Spinal Manipulation on Brain Neurometabolites in Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Irish Journal of Medical Science 2019 (Nov 26) [Epub]

Daryoush Didehdar, Fahimeh Kamali, Amin Kordi Yoosefinejad, Mehrzad Lotfi

Department of Physical Therapy,
School of Rehabilitation Sciences,
Shiraz University of Medical Sciences,
Shiraz, Iran.



BACKGROUND:   In patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain (NCLBP), brain function changes due to the neuroplastic changes in different regions.

AIM:   The current study aimed to evaluate the brain metabolite changes after spinal manipulation, using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS).

METHODS:   In the current study, 25 patients with NCLBP aged 20-50 years were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to lumbopelvic manipulation or sham. Patients were evaluated before and 5 weeks after treatment by the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS), the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and 1H-MRS.

RESULTS:   After treatment, severity of pain and functional disability were significantly reduced in the treatment group vs. sham group (p < 0.05). After treatment, N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) in thalamus, insula, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) regions, as well as choline (Cho) in the thalamus, insula, and somatosensory cortex (SSC) regions, had increased significantly in the treatment group compared with the sham group (p < 0.05). A significant increase was further observed in NAA in thalamus, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and SCC regions along with Cho metabolite in thalamus and SCC regions after treatment in the treatment group compared with the baseline measures (p < 0.05).

There are more articles like this @ our:

LOW BACK Section

(more…)

Spinal Manipulation Therapy: Is It All About the Brain?

By |May 29, 2019|Neurology|

Spinal Manipulation Therapy: Is It All About the Brain? A Current Review of the Neurophysiological Effects of Manipulation

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Journal of Integrative Medicine 2019 (May 9) [Epub]

Giles Gyer, Jimmy Michael, James Inklebarger, Jaya Shanker Tedla

The London College of Osteopathic Medicine,
London NW1 6QH, United Kingdom.


Spinal manipulation has been an effective intervention for the management of various musculoskeletal disorders. However, the mechanisms underlying the pain modulatory effects of spinal manipulation remain elusive. Although both biomechanical and neurophysiological phenomena have been thought to play a role in the observed clinical effects of spinal manipulation, a growing number of recent studies have indicated peripheral, spinal and supraspinal mechanisms of manipulation and suggested that the improved clinical outcomes are largely of neurophysiological origin.

In this article, we reviewed the relevance of various neurophysiological theories with respect to the findings of mechanistic studies that demonstrated neural responses following spinal manipulation. This article also discussed whether these neural responses are associated with the possible neurophysiological mechanisms of spinal manipulation. The body of literature reviewed herein suggested some clear neurophysiological changes following spinal manipulation, which include neural plastic changes, alteration in motor neuron excitability, increase in cortical drive and many more. However, the clinical relevance of these changes in relation to the mechanisms that underlie the effectiveness of spinal manipulation is still unclear. In addition, there were some major methodological flaws in many of the reviewed studies. Future mechanistic studies should have an appropriate study design and methodology and should plan for a long-term follow-up in order to determine the clinical significance of the neural responses evoked following spinal manipulation.

(more…)

The Influence of Neck Pain on Sensorimotor Function in the Elderly

By |January 28, 2019|Neurology, Subluxation|

The Influence of Neck Pain on Sensorimotor Function in the Elderly

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2012 (Nov); 55 (3): 667–672

Sureeporn Uthaikhup, Gwendolen Jull, Somporn Sungkarat, Julia Treleaven

Department of Physical Therapy,
Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences,
Chiang Mai University,
Thailand.


Greater disturbances in sensorimotor control have been demonstrated in younger to middle aged groups. However, it is unknown whether or not the impairments documented in these populations can be extrapolated to elders with neck pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of neck pain on sensorimotor function in elders. Twenty elders with neck pain (12 women and 8 men) and 20 healthy elder controls (14 women and 6 men) aged 65 years and over were recruited from the general community. Tests for sensorimotor function included; cervical joint position sense (JPS); computerised rod-and-frame test (RFT); smooth pursuit neck torsion test (SPNT); standing balance (under conditions of eyes open, eyes closed on firm and soft surfaces in comfortable stance); step test and ten-meter walk test with and without head movement.

Elders with neck pain had greater deficits in the majority of sensorimotor function tests after controlling for effects of age and comorbidities. Significant differences were found in the SPNT (p<0.01), error in the RFT (frame angled at 10° and 15° anticlockwise) (p<0.05), standing balance (amplitude of sway) – eyes open on a firm surface in the medio-lateral (ML) direction (p=0.03), and total number of steps on the step test, both left and right sides (p<0.01).

Elders with neck pain have greater sensorimotor disturbances than elders without neck pain, supporting a contribution of altered afferent information originating from the cervical spine to such disturbances. The findings may inform falls prevention and management programs.

There are more articles like this @ our:

SENIOR CARE Page

(more…)

Joint Position Sense Error in People With Neck Pain

By |January 25, 2019|Neurology|

Joint Position Sense Error in People With Neck Pain: A Systematic Review

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Man Ther. 2015 (Dec); 20 (6): 736–744

J. de Vries, B.K. Ischebeck, L.P. Voogt, J.N. van der Geest, M. Janssen, M.A. Frens, G.J. Kleinrensink

Department of Neuroscience,
Erasmus MC, P.O. Box 2040,
3000 CA Rotterdam,
The Netherlands


BACKGROUND:   Several studies in recent decades have examined the relationship between proprioceptive deficits and neck pain. However, there is no uniform conclusion on the relationship between the two. Clinically, proprioception is evaluated using the Joint Position Sense Error (JPSE), which reflects a person’s ability to accurately return his head to a predefined target after a cervical movement.

OBJECTIVES:   We focused to differentiate between JPSE in people with neck pain compared to healthy controls.

STUDY DESIGN:   Systematic review according to the PRISMA guidelines.

METHOD:   Our data sources were Embase, Medline OvidSP, Web of Science, Cochrane Central, CINAHL and Pubmed Publisher. To be included, studies had to compare JPSE of the neck (O) in people with neck pain (P) with JPSE of the neck in healthy controls (C).

RESULTS/FINDINGS:   Fourteen studies were included. Four studies reported that participants with traumatic neck pain had a significantly higher JPSE than healthy controls. Of the eight studies involving people with non-traumatic neck pain, four reported significant differences between the groups. The JPSE did not vary between neck-pain groups.

There are more articles like this @ our:

CHIROPRACTIC and VERTIGO Page

(more…)