Support Chiropractic Research!

Chiropractic Scoliosis Rehabilitation Treatment

By |November 26, 2015|Scoliosis|

Results of Chiropractic Scoliosis Rehabilitation Treatment at Two Years Post-skeletal Maturity in Identical Female Twins

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Bodyw Mov Ther. 2015 (Oct);   19 (4):   592–596


Brian Dovorany, Mark W. Morningstar, Clayton Stitzel, Aatif Siddiqui

Private Practice of Chiropractic Medicine,
2031 S Webster Avenue,
Green Bay, WI 54301, USA


BACKGROUND:   Scoliosis treatment guidelines for non-operative management suggest that patients should be followed for two years beyond skeletal maturity to appropriately evaluate treatment effect. This report outlines the results of identical twin girls’ treatment with chiropractic rehabilitation treatment at two years post skeletal maturity.

FINDINGS:   The twins participated in a treatment lasting two weeks, followed by home care maintenance and periodic follow-ups for they reached skeletal maturity. Two year follow up showed reduced Cobb angles of 19° and 15°, respectively.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Scoliosis and Chiropractic Page

(more…)

Back Pain in Adolescents With Idiopathic Scoliosis

By |June 30, 2015|Chiropractic Care, Scoliosis|

Back Pain in Adolescents With Idiopathic Scoliosis: Epidemiological Study for 43,630 Pupils in Niigata City, Japan

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Eur Spine J. 2011 (Feb);   20 (2):   274–279 ~ FULL TEXT


Tsuyoshi Sato, Toru Hirano, Takui Ito, Osamu Morita, Ren Kikuchi,
Naoto Endo, and Naohito Tanabe

Department of Orthopedic Surgery,
Niigata Prefectural Shibata Hospital,
Shibata, Japan.
tsuyoshis1@mac.com


There have been a few studies regarding detail of back pain in adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis (IS) as prevalence, location, and severity. The condition of back pain in adolescents with IS was clarified based on a cross-sectional study using a questionnaire survey, targeting a total of 43,630 pupils, including all elementary school pupils from the fourth to sixth grade (21,893 pupils) and all junior high pupils from the first to third year (21,737 pupils) in Niigata City (population of 785,067), Japan.

32,134 pupils were determined to have valid responses (valid response rate: 73.7%). In Niigata City, pupils from the fourth grade of elementary school to the third year of junior high school are screened for scoliosis every year. This screening system involves a three-step survey, and the third step of the survey is an imaging and medical examination at the Niigata University Hospital.

In this study, the pupils who answered in the questionnaire that they had been advised to visit Niigata University Hospital after the school screening were defined as Scoliosis group (51 pupils; 0.159%) and the others were defined as No scoliosis group (32,083 pupils). The point and lifetime prevalence of back pain, the duration, the recurrence, the severity and the location of back pain were compared between these groups.

The severity of back pain was divided into three levels (level 1 no limitation in any activity; level 2 necessary to refrain from participating in sports and physical activities, and level 3 necessary to be absent from school). The point prevalence was 11.4% in No scoliosis group, and 27.5% in Scoliosis group. The lifetime prevalence was 32.9% in No scoliosis group, and 58.8% in Scoliosis group. According to the gender- and school-grade-adjusted odds ratios (OR), Scoliosis group showed a more than twofold elevated odds of back pain compared to No scoliosis group irrespective of the point or lifetime prevalence of back pain (OR, 2.29; P = 0.009 and OR, 2.10; P = 0.012, respectively).

Scoliosis group experienced significantly more severe pain, and of a significantly longer duration with more frequent recurrences in comparison to No scoliosis group. Scoliosis group showed significantly more back pain in the upper and middle right back in comparison to No scoliosis group. These findings suggest that there is a relationship between pain around the right scapula in Scoliosis group and the right rib hump that is common in IS.


 

From the Full-Text Article:

Introduction:

Most patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) visit the hospital when a trunk deformity, such as rib or lumbar hump and waist asymmetry, is pointed out either after the school screening or by family members, and it is rare for these patients to visit the hospital due to back pain. However, some adolescent patients with idiopathic scoliosis (IS) do complaint of back pain in outpatient clinics. Previously, it had been accepted that special attention should be paid to patients with scoliosis who experienced back pain, because it was thought that might be additional pathologies such as an occult syrinx, spinal cord tumors, or neuromuscular disorders [4, 6, 20].

There are more articles like this @ our:

Scoliosis and Chiropractic Page

(more…)

Outcomes For Adult Scoliosis Patients Receiving Chiropractic Rehabilitation

By |October 19, 2014|Scoliosis|

Outcomes For Adult Scoliosis Patients Receiving Chiropractic Rehabilitation:
A 24-month Retrospective Analysis

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Chiropractic Medicine 2011 (Sep);   10 (3):   179–184


Mark W. Morningstar, DC

Private Practice, Grand Blanc, MI


OBJECTIVES:   The purpose of this study was to retrospectively report the results of patients who completed an exercise-based chiropractic program and its potential to alter the natural progression of adult scoliosis at 24 months after the clinic portion of treatment was concluded.

METHODS:   A retrospective chart review was conducted at 2 spine clinics in Michigan, USA. Each clinic uses the same chiropractic rehabilitation program to treat patients with adult scoliosis. Multidimensional patient outcomes included radiographic, respiratory, disability, and pain parameters. Outcomes were measured at baseline, at end of active treatment, and at long-term follow-up.

RESULTS:   A total of 28 patients fit the inclusion criteria for the study. The average beginning primary Cobb angle was 44° ± 6°. Patients received the same chiropractic rehabilitation program for approximately 6 months. At the end of active treatment, improvements were recorded in Cobb angle, pain scores, spirometry, and disability rating. All radiographic findings were maintained at 24-month follow-up.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Scoliosis and Chiropractic Page

(more…)

Manipulative and Rehabilitative Therapy as a Treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis Without Psychological Sequelae

By |October 10, 2014|Continuing Education, Scoliosis|

Manipulative and Rehabilitative Therapy as a Treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis Without Psychological Sequelae

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Chiropractic Medicine 2012 (Jun);   11 (2):   109–114


Jorge H. Villafañe, PT, MSc, PhD, Guillermo B. Silva, MSc, PhD, Andrea Dughera, MSc

Physical Therapist, Department of Physical Therapy,
Residenze Sanitarie Assistenziali
“A. Maritano,” Sangano, Italy.


OBJECTIVE:   The purpose of this case report is to describe management and outcomes of a patient with scoliosis.

CLINICAL FEATURES:   A 9-year-old female patient with a double curve pattern with Cobb angles of 18° and 24° (thoracic/thoracolumbar) compatible with scoliosis presented for physical therapy treatment.

INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME:   Physiotherapy treatment with a combination of manipulative and rehabilitation techniques was used. After finishing the treatment, the patient had Cobb angles of 7° and 11°, an improvement of 55% and 54%, respectively. After 6 months, these effects were maintained, as the patient had Cobb angles of 11° and 11°. The clinical appearance of the patient improved after the course of care. The patient was evaluated for psychological outcomes by applying the following tests: Scoliosis Research Society 22, Bad Sobernheim Stress, and the Brace Questionnaire The patient had the maximum score in all tests at the conclusion of therapy.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Scoliosis and Chiropractic Page

(more…)

Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Screening For School, Community, and Clinical Health Promotion Practice Utilizing the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model

By |May 25, 2014|Scoliosis|

Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Screening For School, Community, and Clinical Health Promotion Practice Utilizing the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Osteopathy 2005 (Nov 30); 13: 25 ~ FULL TEXT


Timothy A Mirtz, Mark A Thompson, Leon Greene, Lawrence A Wyatt, and Cynthia G Akagi

Department of Health Sport and Exercise Science, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, USA. numitor@ku.edu


Background   Screening for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a commonly performed procedure for school children during the high risk years. The PRECEDE-PROCEDE (PP) model is a health promotion planning model that has not been utilized for the clinical diagnosis of AIS. The purpose of this research is to study AIS in the school age population using the PP model and its relevance for community, school, and clinical health promotion.

Methods   MEDLINE was utilized to locate AIS data. Studies were screened for relevance and applicability under the auspices of the PP model. Where data was unavailable, expert opinion was utilized based on consensus.

Results   The social assessment of quality of life is limited with few studies approaching the long-term effects of AIS. Epidemiologically, AIS is the most common form of scoliosis and leading orthopedic problem in children. Behavioral/environmental studies focus on discovering etiologic relationships yet this data is confounded because AIS is not a behavioral. Illness and parenting health behaviors can be appreciated. The educational diagnosis is confounded because AIS is an orthopedic disorder and not behavioral. The administration/policy diagnosis is hindered in that scoliosis screening programs are not considered cost-effective. Policies are determined in some schools because 26 states mandate school scoliosis screening. There exists potential error with the Adam’s test. The most widely used measure in the PP model, the Health Belief Model, has not been utilized in any AIS research.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Scoliosis and Chiropractic Page

(more…)

Children and Scoliosis

By |July 6, 2013|Pediatrics, Scoliosis|

Children and Scoliosis

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Dynamic Chiropractic

By Kim Christensen, DC, DACRB, CCSP, CSCS


Scoliosis is defined as “any lateral deviation of the spine from the mid-sagittal plane.” [1]

While there are many causes for scoliosis, children and adolescents with scoliosis who present to chiropractors usually fall into three categories.

Successful treatment is dependent upon differentiating the underlying cause of the spinal curvature. In most children, the scoliotic spine is not symptomatic; the spinal curvature is first noticed either by a parent who becomes concerned about a child’s posture, or during a screening examination, usually at school. The importance of a good evaluation and early treatment is to prevent progression and worsening of the curvature. Children with all three major causes of scoliosis should have a careful evaluation of the lower extremities as part of their spinal examination to determine associated or contributing components to the spinal deviation.

  1. Structural vs. Nonstructural Scoliosis   A structural scoliosis is defined as a spinal curvature that does not correct during recumbent, lateral flexion radiographs. The two most common causes of a structural scoliosis are congenital and idiopathic. A nonstructural scoliosis can be reduced when lying down, and will correct with recumbent lateral flexion. This type of spinal curvature is sometimes called a “functional curve,” and is often secondary to a leg length discrepancy.

  2. Congenital Scoliosis   Of the three major etiologies of scoliosis, this is the least common. Congenital scoliosis develops secondary to a bony anomaly of the sacrum, vertebrae or ribs. These are often defects of formation or segmentation, resulting in wedged, blocked, or hemi-vertebrae. In some cases, the abnormality will require corrective surgery. In many children, a heel lift or shoe buildup can provide sufficient structural support, and help to maintain a balanced spine.When a congenital spinal anomaly is discovered, it’s important to remember that there are usually multiple affected areas. For instance, it is more common to have multiple bony abnormalities than just a single level. Nonosseous and extraspinal deformities are also often present. These may include the cartilaginous and connective tissues, and even genitourinary or cardiovascular abnormalities. Clubfoot, a congenitally dislocated hip, or an anatomically short leg often will contribute to the spinal imbalance.
  3. Idiopathic Scoliosis   Idiopathic scoliosis can be progressive, worsening significantly during periods of rapid growth. In the more severe cases, bracing, or possibly surgery, may be necessary to prevent substantial deformity. [2] After skeletal maturity, most curvatures progress only slowly, if at all. Recent scientific research has focused on hormonal and neurological causes for idiopathic scoliosis, with some promising early results, but no definitive conclusions.

Learn more about Scoliosis @ our:

Scoliosis and Chiropractic Page

(more…)