Support Chiropractic Research!

Health Care

Home/Health Care

New International Health Survey of Sicker Adults Finds Those With a Medical Home Fare Better

By |November 10, 2011|Health Care|

Chronically and Seriously Ill U.S. Adults Stand Out for Skipping Needed Care Due to Costs and Struggling with Medical Debt

Source Commonwealth Fund

New York, NY, November 9, 2011—Chronically and seriously ill adults who received care from a medical home—an accessible primary care practice that helps coordinate care—were less likely to report medical errors, test duplication, and other care coordination failures, according to a new Commonwealth Fund international survey of patients’ experiences in the U.S. and 10 other high-income countries. Published as a Health Affairs “Web First” article, the study also found that patients connected with medical homes had better relationships with their doctors and rated their care more highly.

The 2011 survey of more than 18,000 sicker adults in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States included people who reported they were in fair or poor health, had surgery or had been hospitalized in the past two years, or had received care for a serious or chronic illness, injury, or disability in the past year. The study identified patients as having a medical home if they reported having a regular source of care that knows their medical history, is accessible, and helps coordinate care received from other providers.

Sicker adults in the U.K. and Switzerland were most likely to have a medical home, with nearly three-quarters connected to practices that have characteristics of a medical home, compared to about 33 percent to 65 percent in the other nine countries. U.K. and Swiss patients also reported more positive health care experiences than sicker adults in the other countries: they were more likely to be able to get a same- or next-day appointment when sick and to have easy access to after-hours care, and they were less likely to experience poorly coordinated care.

Sicker adults in the U.S. stood out for having the highest rates of problems paying medical bills and going without needed care because of the cost. Forty-two percent reported not visiting a doctor, not filling a prescription or skipping medication doses, or not getting recommended care—a significantly higher proportion than in all the other countries, and more than double the rates in Canada, France, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, and the U.K. Moreover, U.S. patients had among the highest rates of self-reported medication, lab, or medical errors, as well as gaps in coordination of care. (more…)

Smokers and the obese cheaper to care for, study shows

By |April 5, 2011|Health Care|

Source New York Times

Preventing obesity and smoking can save lives, but it does not save money, according to a new report.

It costs more to care for healthy people who live years longer, according to a Dutch study that counters the common perception that preventing obesity would save governments millions of dollars.

“It was a small surprise,” said Pieter van Baal, an economist at the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment in the Netherlands, who led the study. “But it also makes sense. If you live longer, then you cost the health system more.”

In a paper published online Monday in the Public Library of Science Medicine journal, Dutch researchers found that the health costs of thin and healthy people in adulthood are more expensive than those of either fat people or smokers. (more…)

World Spine Care

By |February 14, 2011|Health Care|

Source WorldSpineCare.org

World Spine Care was founded in 2008, Scott Haldemanthe inspiration of Scott Haldeman, a leading figure in the assessment and treatment of spinal disorders. World Spine Care has rapidly attracted a world-class leadership team around its vision of universal care for the devastation caused by spinal disorders in the developing world. The Board of Directors includes Elon Musk, co-founder of PayPal, CEO of Tesla Motors and SpaceX, and Chairman of the Musk Foundation. Active participants in the World Spine Care programs include medical physicians, surgeons, physiotherapists, chiropractors, and scientists from Canada and the U.S., with representation from Europe, Asia and Africa.

World Spine Care (WSC) has been launched to fill the profound gap in the treatment of musculoskeletal conditions found in the developing world. WSC is a multinational not-for-profit organization, bringing together the full spectrum of health care professionals involved in spinal health – medical physicians and specialists, surgeons, chiropractors, and physiotherapists. WSC is focused on providing evidence-based, culturally integrated prevention, assessment, and treatment of spinal disorders in the developing world. The flagship project involves developing and initial deployment of a universal model of care for spinal disorders, designed for practical application by front-line health care workers in developing nations worldwide. (more…)

Congress Moves to Expand Chiropractic Services to Veterans and Military Beneficiaries

By |February 4, 2011|Health Care|

Chiropractic Profession Urged to Enlist Support from Local Members of Congress

Source The American Chiropractic Association

The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) and the Association of Chiropractic Colleges (ACC) today expressed support for newly introduced legislation in the U.S. House of Representatives designed to expand the availability of the services delivered by chiropractic physicians in the federal Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and to those who utilize the military’s health care delivery system, TRICARE, run by the Department of Defense (DoD).

Ranking member of the House Veterans Affairs Committee, Rep. Bob Filner (D-Calif.), has again introduced the Chiropractic Care to All Veterans Act (H.R. 329), a bill similar to legislation that was overwhelmingly passed by the entire House in 2010 but was not considered in the Senate. H.R. 329 would require the VA to have a chiropractic physician on staff at all major VA medical facilities by 2014. It would also amend the current statute, the Department of Veterans Affairs Health Care Programs Enhancement Act of 2001, ensuring that chiropractic benefits are included in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations and therefore, cannot be denied. (more…)

Concierge Chiropractic

By |February 2, 2011|Health Care|

Chicago, IL (PRWEB)

Doctors Bryan Abrams and Anthony Ries have recently launched Concierge Chiropractic, a new business venture that brings treatment directly to the patient’s residence or business in downtown Chicago (specifically Gold Coast, River North, and Streeterville) Chicago. The doctors come equipped with a portable table, doctor’s kit, assistant and patient gowns to readily transform any home into a chiropractic office. (more…)

The Concierge Practice

By |September 16, 2010|Health Care|

Sources:

Modern Medicine, How to set up a concierge practice
The Health Care Blog

Doc, you realize your office is a lot like Disney World,” an unhappy patient quipped to Mark R. Wheeler, an internist in Louisville. “It’s a three-hour wait for a 20-second ride.”

“That comment spoke volumes about what was going on in my practice,” says Wheeler. “I was always behind. My patients weren’t happy, and neither were my staff, my family, or me.”

Today, Wheeler is a changed man, calling his partner, internist John Varga, and himself “two of the luckiest physicians on the face of this earth.”

The turning point came last September when the two physicians officially opened OneMD—a retainer or concierge-style practice that caps the number of patients at 300 per doctor. In return for a $4,000 annual fee ($6,000 per couple), patients get 24/7 access, reduced in-office waiting time, house calls, an enhanced yearly health exam, and other gold-plated services not generally covered by insurers. About 200 patients to date have enrolled—and the practice is “right on the fringe” of profitability.

“We don’t claim to be practicing better medicine,” says Wheeler, “but the fact that we can spend more time with our patients means they’re going to get better care.” (more…)